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Science News - by scipa

 
Science News on research in the fields of: Evolution - Robotics - Genes - Embryonic Stem Cells - Astronomy - Biology - Geology - Archeology - Engineering - Disease Treatments

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Super Duper Moon!

March 19th 2011 05:31
March 19th - all of you should mark this day on your dairy. This is going to be the day when the moon is going to be nearest to the earth that you will be facing on this earth and am lucky to be alive to grab this opportunity, if the clouds do not fail to take a memorable picture of the moon being the closes to the earth. If you could get one on your city, share with me!

Of course, no celestial event has been left without rumors and scientists clarifying doubts... this will stat as long as the concept of destruction of earth occurs. This means the occurrence of the moon coming closer to the earth is going to cause no mishap to the earth in the form high or low tides or earthquakes. The scientists has outruled what happened in Japan is no way related to this.




Be ready to grab your cameras today!!!
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Japan Mettle Tested Again!

March 17th 2011 09:53
Well, this is going to sound too familiar and there is no point in me taking more time pen down not one, not two, but three ctalycsm that Japan is facing following what the Japanese Prime Minister initially thought was a crises following the Richter 9.0 earthquake in Japan, after 140 years, actually turned into a devastation with the tsunami that followed the aftermath of earthquake tilting the earth by an angle of 4 degree on their axis raising 20 feet high waves, and tossing ships like a toy into the city. Nevertheless, the devastation became a probable destruction with the possibility of nuclear leak for the nuclear tanks could be bursting any moment. Are they ready to get a lending hand in curbing devastation to destruction?
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Well, this is going to sound too familiar and there is no point in me taking more time pen down not one, not two, but three ctalycsm that Japan is facing following what the Japanese Prime Minister initially thought was a crises following the Richter 9.0 earthquake in Japan, after 140 years, actually turned into a devastation with the tsunami that followed the aftermath of earthquake tilting the earth by an angle of 4 degree on their axis raising 20 feet high waves, and tossing ships like a toy into the city. Nevertheless, the devastation became a probable destruction with the possibility of nuclear leak for the nuclear tanks could be bursting any moment. Are they ready to get a lending hand in curbing devastation to destruction?
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Pinch The Chloroplast To Divide!

January 26th 2011 03:31
Tsuneyoshi Kuriwa from Rikkyo University along with his colleagues recently reported to The Scientist about their finding on the division of chloroplast that they unlike other organelles in the cell do not divide by splitting, rather divided like the cell by forming a contractile rings made of polyglucans (starch-like fibers) to divide into two. This means there is going to be two fully matured chloroplasts in each of the divided cells and not the precursors for an all-new chloroplast formation.

Mitochondria is yet another organelle that divides concurrently with the cell, but by using proteins and not glucans to form the contractile rings that are essential for dividing them into two concurrent with the cell division.

[ Click here to read more ]
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African and forest elephants have long been debated to be two distinct species, and not variants. African elephants are better known to have the woolly mammoths as their predecessors, while Asian elephants have African elephants. Whether this is true or not is not yet known…but this is confirmed based on the genetic reports that African and forest elephants in Africa are two distinct species.

Research has revealed that these two species are distinct and has been diverged between 2.6 and 5.6 million years ago. A group under the head of David Reich of Harvard Medical School who claims that a controversy has been settled, conducted this research.

[ Click here to read more ]
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A Second Sun To Mother Earth?

January 24th 2011 03:20
This may sound unusual and to the resentment many of those in the tropics facing the hottest climate, and to those working on the melting polar ice, the news of the second sun is surely not welcoming. Probably, this could add to the bane of the melting ice and reducing the blame on human race.


[ Click here to read more ]
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Science And Statistics!

January 23rd 2011 05:57
Stats, Oh My Gosh! I hate them, they are just meddling with numbers that many use to get the results they want....but that is not the case: Stats could be really useful for you to predict and analyse the raw data that you have. Statistics could many a times turn out to be an useful tool to foresee what's next and can help you to choose what should be the next step to test your hypothesis?


[ Click here to read more ]
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Extinction is a process in evolution. There has been many facts and evidences with the evolution of earth, life of earth, creation of man and him developing as a social animal via the various archaeological evidences dug from the bottom of the earth.

Extinction is not a terminology as Biosphere reserves, patent and TRADE were all the policies that developed for directly or indirectly to sustain the life on earth.

[ Click here to read more ]
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A small news tidbit to stir up the furthermore the everlasting two schools of thoughts - is this news worth initiating heated arguments and debates from the communities on science ethics, spiritual beliefs and faith, theories on evolution versus the archeological evidences on the creation of MAN?

Well, coming to the point, Japanese scientists has decided to venture on resurrecting the believed hypothetical beast, the mammoth, that evolved to the timid giant of this day, the elephant.

[ Click here to read more ]
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Well, as a regular reader of The Scientist, there is no chance for me to miss the results of the "Life Science Innovations Competition For The Year 2010", this being the third annual event for this competition. This year the number of entries increased to a breathtaking total of 60, and the magazine did not fail in inviting some of the pioneers to the life science innovation industry, namely, Neil Kelleher, Molecular Chemist, North Western University; Sequencing Pioneer, Jonathan Rothberg; Amy Caudy, Genomicist, Princeton University; and Pacfic Northwest National Laboratory Biologist, H. Steven Wiley to be the judges. The judges also did not fail in the challenging task put in front of them and brought to the papers in the magazine the TOP TEN entries, which are discussed below. One key feature in the end that was identified to be the reason for their success is that all the TT entries had something to contribute in the years ahead of the scientific experimentation.

1. Third Generation Sequencer:

[ Click here to read more ]
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